Category Archives: relaxation

100 breaths Meditation

Adam Quang .com

Visit Adam new website

 

We filmed our chair yoga video here and as a bonus for you, a free mediation video as the sun rise at Wat Chaiwatthanaram temple (built in 1630 AD) – Ayutthaya, Thailand.

Meditation is valuable discipline that can help you stay young in both body and spirit. 100 deep breath meditation each day can reduces stress, improved memory, increased resistance to distraction and social pressure, improved brain functioning… (see research findings here)

Distraction free video with out wording,
click => Meditation For Dummies & Complete Beginners: 100 Breaths

YouTube Preview Image

Share

Yoga & Drug

Yoga & DrugPromote love and acceptant, a live video class connecting those affected by substance abuse with free access to yoga and meditation in the privacy of their own home. In collaboration with You Are Beautiful project at World Karma Project and Free To Be Fit.

 

Starting April.22.2015
Join Adam Quang every Wednesdays (7-8pm) via Skype (YogiSecret) or Google Plus.
– See below or click here or more info:  Free To Be Fit / FB page.

Free To Be Fit

Share

Simple Things That Will Make You Happier, Backed By Science

EXERCISE MORE – 7 MINUTES MIGHT BE ENOUGH

You might have seen some talk recently about the scientific 7 minute workout mentioned in The New York Times. So if you thought exercise was something you didn’t have time for, maybe you can fit it in after all.

Exercise has such a profound effect on our happiness and well-being that it’s actually been proven to be an effective strategy for overcoming depression. In a study cited in Shawn Achor’s book, The Happiness Advantage, three groups of patients treated their depression with exercise. The results of this study really surprised me. Although all three groups experienced similar improvements in their happiness levels to begin with, the follow up assessments proved to be radically different:

The groups were then tested six months later to assess their relapse rate. Of those who had taken the medication alone, 38 percent had slipped back into depression. Those in the combination group were doing only slightly better, with a 31 percent relapse rate. The biggest shock, though, came from the exercise group: Their relapse rate was only 9 percent!

You don’t have to be depressed to gain benefit from exercise, though. It can help you to relax, increase your brain power and even improve your body image, even if you don’t lose any weight.

study in the Journal of Health Psychology found that people who exercised felt better about their bodies, even when they saw no physical changes:

Body weight, shape and body image were assessed in 16 males and 18 females before and after both 6 × 40 mins exercise and 6 × 40 mins reading. Over both conditions, body weight and shape did not change. Various aspects of body image, however, improved after exercise compared to before.

We’ve explored exercise in depth before, and looked at what it does to our brains, such as releasing proteins and endorphins that make us feel happier, as you can see in the image below.

SLEEP MORE – YOU’LL BE LESS SENSITIVE TO NEGATIVE EMOTIONS

We know that sleep helps our bodies to recover from the day and repair themselves, and that it helps us focus and be more productive. It turns out, it’s also important for our happiness.

In NutureShock, Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman explain how sleep affects our positivity:

Negative stimuli get processed by the amygdala; positive or neutral memories gets processed by the hippocampus. Sleep deprivation hits the hippocampus harder than the amygdala. The result is that sleep-deprived people fail to recall pleasant memories, yet recall gloomy memories just fine.

In one experiment by Walker, sleep-deprived college students tried to memorize a list of words. They could remember 81% of the words with a negative connotation, like “cancer.” But they could remember only 31% of the words with a positive or neutral connotation, like “sunshine” or “basket.”

The BPS Research Digest explores another study that proves sleep affects our sensitivity to negative emotions. Using a facial recognition task over the course of a day, the researchers studied how sensitive participants were to positive and negative emotions. Those who worked through the afternoon without taking a nap became more sensitive late in the day to negative emotions like fear and anger.

Using a face recognition task, here we demonstrate an amplified reactivity to anger and fear emotions across the day, without sleep. However, an intervening nap blocked and even reversed this negative emotional reactivity to anger and fear while conversely enhancing ratings of positive (happy) expressions.

Of course, how well (and how long) you sleep will probably affect how you feel when you wake up, which can make a difference to your whole day. Especially this graph showing how your brain activity decreases is a great insight about how important enough sleep is for productivity and happiness:

brn2

Another study tested how employees’ moods when they started work in the morning affected their work day.

Researchers found that employees’ moods when they clocked in tended to affect how they felt the rest of the day. Early mood was linked to their perceptions of customers and to how they reacted to customers’ moods.

And most importantly to managers, employee mood had a clear impact on performance, including both how much work employees did and how well they did it.

Sleep is another topic we’ve looked into before, exploring how much sleep we really need to be productive.

HELP OTHERS – 100 HOURS A YEAR IS THE MAGICAL NUMBER

One of the most counterintuitive pieces of advice I found is that to make yourself feel happier, you should help others. In fact, 100 hours per year (or two hours per week) is the optimal time we should dedicate to helping others in order to enrich our lives.

If we go back to Shawn Achor’s book again, he says this about helping others:

…when researchers interviewed more than 150 people about their recent purchases, they found that money spent on activities—such as concerts and group dinners out—brought far more pleasure than material purchases like shoes, televisions, or expensive watches. Spending money on other people, called “prosocial spending,” also boosts happiness.

The Journal of Happiness Studies published a study that explored this very topic:

Participants recalled a previous purchase made for either themselves or someone else and then reported their happiness. Afterward, participants chose whether to spend a monetary windfall on themselves or someone else. Participants assigned to recall a purchase made for someone else reported feeling significantly happier immediately after this recollection; most importantly, the happier participants felt, the more likely they were to choose to spend a windfall on someone else in the near future.

So spending money on other people makes us happier than buying stuff for ourselves. What about spending our time on other people? A study of volunteering in Germany explored how volunteers were affected when their opportunities to help others were taken away:

 Shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall but before the German reunion, the first wave of data of the GSOEP was collected in East Germany. Volunteering was still widespread. Due to the shock of the reunion, a large portion of the infrastructure of volunteering (e.g. sports clubs associated with firms) collapsed and people randomly lost their opportunities for volunteering. Based on a comparison of the change in subjective well-being of these people and of people from the control group who had no change in their volunteer status, the hypothesis is supported that volunteering is rewarding in terms of higher life satisfaction.

In his book Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being, University of Pennsylvania professor Martin Seligman explains that helping others can improve our own lives:

…we scientists have found that doing a kindness produces the single most reliable momentary increase in well-being of any exercise we have tested.

PRACTICE SMILING – IT CAN ALLEVIATE PAIN

Smiling itself can make us feel better, but it’s more effective when we back it up with positive thoughts, according to this study:

A new study led by a Michigan State University business scholar suggests customer-service workers who fake smile throughout the day worsen their mood and withdraw from work, affecting productivity. But workers who smile as a result of cultivating positive thoughts – such as a tropical vacation or a child’s recital – improve their mood and withdraw less.

Of course it’s important to practice “real smiles” where you use your eye sockets. It’s very easy to spot the difference:

brn3

According to PsyBlogsmiling can improve our attention and help us perform better on cognitive tasks:

Smiling makes us feel good which also increases our attentional flexibility and our ability to think holistically. When this idea was tested by Johnson et al. (2010), the results showed that participants who smiled performed better on attentional tasks which required seeing the whole forest rather than just the trees.

A smile is also a good way to alleviate some of the pain we feel in troubling circumstances:

Smiling is one way to reduce the distress caused by an upsetting situation. Psychologists call this the facial feedback hypothesis. Even forcing a smile when we don’t feel like it is enough to lift our mood slightly (this is one example of embodied cognition).

One of our previous posts goes into even more detail about the science of smiling.

MEDITATE – REWIRE YOUR BRAIN FOR HAPPINESS

Meditation is often touted as an important habit for improving focus, clarity and attention p, as well as helping to keep you calm. It turns out it’s also useful for improving your happiness:

In one study, a research team from Massachusetts General Hospital looked at the brain scans of 16 people before and after they participated in an eight-week course in mindfulness meditation. The study, published in the January issue of Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, concluded that after completing the course, parts of the participants’ brains associated with compassion and self-awareness grew, and parts associated with stress shrank.

Meditation literally clears your mind and calms you down, it’s been often proven to be the single most effective way to live a happier live. I believe that this graphic explains it the best:

brn4

According to Shawn Achor, meditation can actually make you happier long-term:

Studies show that in the minutes right after meditating, we experience feelings of calm and contentment, as well as heightened awareness and empathy. And, research even shows that regular meditation can permanently rewire the brain to raise levels of happiness.

The fact that we can actually alter our brain structure through mediation is most surprising to me and somewhat reassuring that however we feel and think today isn’t permanent.

PRACTICE GRATITUDE – INCREASE BOTH HAPPINESS AND LIFE SATISFACTION

This is a seemingly simple strategy, but I’ve personally found it to make a huge difference to my outlook. There are lots of ways to practice gratitude, from keeping a journal of things you’re grateful for, sharing three good things that happen each day with a friend or your partner, and going out of your way to show gratitude when others help you.

In an experiment where some participants took note of things they were grateful for each day, their moods were improved just from this simple practice:

The gratitude-outlook groups exhibited heightened well-being across several, though not all, of the outcome measures across the 3 studies, relative to the comparison groups. The effect on positive affect appeared to be the most robust finding. Results suggest that a conscious focus on blessings may have emotional and interpersonal benefits.

The Journal of Happiness studies published a study that used letters of gratitude to test how being grateful can affect our levels of happiness:

Participants included 219 men and women who wrote three letters of gratitude over a 3 week period.

Results indicated that writing letters of gratitude increased participants’ happiness and life satisfaction, while decreasing depressive symptoms.

Quick last fact: Getting older will make yourself happier

As a final point, it’s interesting to note that as we get older, particularly past middle age, we tend to grow happier naturally. There’s still some debate over why this happens, but scientists have got a few ideas:

Researchers, including the authors, have found that older people shown pictures of faces or situations tend to focus on and remember the happier ones more and the negative ones less.

Other studies have discovered that as people age, they seek out situations that will lift their moods — for instance, pruning social circles of friends or acquaintances who might bring them down. Still other work finds that older adults learn to let go of loss and disappointment over unachieved goals, and hew their goals toward greater wellbeing.

So if you thought being old would make you miserable, rest assured that it’s likely you’ll develop a more positive outlook than you probably have now.

Via higherperspective.com

Share

Accepting & Letting Go

Like a domino effect, no matter how small and seemingly insignificant a stressor may start out, the accumulation of small stressors could build, compound and create great discomfort. Learn to let go of small things and be more compassionate and accepting of yourself.

I am using yoga practice as an example of “Accepting & Letting Go”, but this same concept can be applied to any aspect of life. Cultivating the mind, will help you to cultivate health and life.

Here are some things you can do to improve your mind cultivation from Stratejoy. Feel free to go visit the site (as long as you don’t mind dealing with the ads that keep popping up.)

8 Strategies To Improve Your Quality Of Life Written
by: Molly Mahar / via from stratejoy
Be Present. Take a deep breath. This is the here and now. Stop ruminating over the past or worrying about the future for a moment. Tell the voices in your head (“your committee”) to be silent. Enjoy your ability to create your experience this very second. If you’re washing the dishes, wash the dishes. If you’re writing a blog post, write the blog post. If you’re playing with your kids, play with your kids. It’s harder than is sounds, but worth practicing every day.

Clarify. When you are clear on what is important to you, there comes an incredible sense of freedom. You no longer live in a world of social comparison. You are running your own race. Goals, big decisions & small habits are surmountable & invigorating because you have a clear picture of what you want your life to stand for. Clarity does not come easily. It also evolves throughout your life, which requires gracious flexibility. But it is worth it. Spend some quality time getting clear.

Give Out. Mentor, contribute, practice random acts of kindness, express gratitude. Make a loan, give your time, be fully present for your family, change the world. There are a million ways to give of yourself. Do it big, do it small, just do it. It’s one of the most positive equations in the world: You give of your time or resources, which improves someone’s quality of life, which makes you feel needed & valuable, which in turn improves your quality of life. We’re all better off. Magic.

Connect. We are social beings. We crave connections to others individually, to our communities, to our world. Pay special attention to your family, your lover, your adored friends, your colleagues & your neighbors. Explore & strengthen your connection to a Higher Power. And be open enough to enjoy the spontaneous connections that come from making a new friend on vacation or sharing a witty remark with your seatmate on the bus. Genuine curiosity & kindness are an amazing way to foster connections, new & old.

Love Yourself. Your body is the vehicle that carries you through your life. Love yourself by treating your body with respect & care. Fuel it well with fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains & lean protein. Move it daily. Don’t smoke, don’t abuse alcohol. Meditate. Help yourself age well by staying flexible, protecting your skin from sun & exercising your mind. Sleep well. Beware the ease in which you critique yourself & indulge in praise instead.”

via stratejoy. Feel free to go visit the site (as long as you don’t mind dealing with the ads that keep popping up.)

Share

Tai-chi in the new: Slow moves to battle body pain

The Toronto Star recently publishes an article Slow moves to battle body pain. Where modern medicine catching up with an old ancient Chinese art form Qigong.

“Swedish study of the effects of qigong on 57 women with fibromyalgia found that regular practice over seven weeks had a positive and reliable effect. The researchers concluded that qigong could be a useful compliment to medical treatment for people with fibromyalgia, a condition characterized by widespread body pain and stiffness.

Qigong is not a cure, but it can enhance flexibility and strength among people who are too ill to exercise vigorously, or even at all.

“It’s deceptive. It seems so simple but it’s quite a powerful tool,” says Andrée Thérèse Stock, 67, who has suffered migraine headaches daily since she was a teenager ”

Slow moves to battle body pain
by FRANCINE KOPUN

Five patients whose lives have been trimmed or gutted by pain stand before their petite class leader at Bridgepoint Health, eyes closed, minds focused on the soft music and instructions to breathe deeply and move slowly.

Mary Laposta sets aside her crutches to participate. A former personal support worker, she has been disabled since a back injury in November 2008, left her in constant pain.

“It’s a relief. When you don’t move because of the pain, it gets worse, so you need to keep moving,” says Laposta, 48, a patient in the pain management program at the hospital, near Gerrard St. E. and the Don Valley Parkway.
That is where qigong comes in. The ancient Chinese martial art is being enlisted by modern medicine to battle the effects of chronic pain, cancer and cancer treatments, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, arthritis and other conditions that can severely limit mobility.

Qigong is not a cure, but it can enhance flexibility and strength among people who are too ill to exercise vigorously, or even at all.

“It’s deceptive. It seems so simple but it’s quite a powerful tool,” says Andrée Thérèse Stock, 67, who has suffered migraine headaches daily since she was a teenager and is also enrolled in the Bridgepoint program.

Qigong combines light, dance-like body movements with breathing and meditation techniques, set to soothing music.

Weekly classes have been held for patients in the pain management program since 2003, says program founder Dr. Edward Robinson.

The program accepts patients suffering from chronic pain as a result of any illness or condition, including severe arthritis and neurological disorders. The groups are sometimes so diverse that the only thing they have in common is pain.

Qigong can be adapted to any level of activity. One group had four or five members who were all in wheelchairs. “They couldn’t walk or stand, but they could do qigong,” says Robinson.

Louisa Leong, a physiotherapist and a qigong instructor at Bridgepoint, learned tai chi and qigong from her father, who is still healthy in his 80s and practicing both each day.?

There is no single qigong authority. The art is passed down from teacher to pupil. Leong has 20 different qigong movements, such as gentle pushing or reaching, that she adapts to the needs of each group.

Patients at Bridgepoint receive a CD that leads them through a 20-minute set of qigong moves they can do at home.

Wellspring cancer support centres in the GTA offer eight-week qigong courses, says Ayala Beck, a manager there.

“It helps patients release tension, focus, feel grounded and improve overall physical condition while dealing with cancer,” says Beck.

One patient with breast cancer who could not lift her arms over her head when she began the course regained a full range of movement after the course, says Beck. “It’s very popular.”

Qigong movements are similar to the movements used in tai chi and incorporate some simplified tai chi moves, at a slower, gentler pace. The emphasis in qigong is on releasing tension and preserving mobility.

Fervent disciples of the art claim qigong can result in miraculous cures. Modern science has more temperate views.

A 2007 Swedish study of the effects of qigong on 57 women with fibromyalgia found that regular practice over seven weeks had a positive and reliable effect. The researchers concluded that qigong could be a useful compliment to medical treatment for people with fibromyalgia, a condition characterized by widespread body pain and stiffness.

Lyn McMahon leads qigong groups at Wellspring for people recovering from surgery, chemotherapy and radiation. She also helps lead public qigong classes at St. Andrew’s Church on Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m., where the fee is $7 for a class. The class is on summer break and resumes Sept. 8.

McMahon believes in the elusive concept of qi, which in Chinese philosophy is a life force that flows through the human body. Qigong promotes the proper flow of this energy and builds internal energy, strengthening the immune system, she says.

“You have to be patient and you have to do the breathing and postures and you have to challenge yourself,” says McMahon. “Making small changes will make a big difference eventually. That’s the theory we use.”

Richmond Hill physiotherapist Elliot Tse, says he uses tai chi and qigong for personal relaxation and exercise. He often recommends them to patients who want to improve balance and cardiovascular function. He thinks they offer a good alternative to more traditional exercises, which can be dull and repetitive.

“It has momentum. It makes people more willing to do it at home.”

Thanks Marilyn K. & Hsioh-fan S. for the tip

Share

#1 Guided Relaxation – Sunset Over Mexico Ocean by Adam Quang

#1 Guided Relaxation – Sunset Over Mexico Ocean by Adam Quang

helps you sleep, helps you relax, calms your mind, and clears your thoughts for meditation

find a comfortable sitting position, or lie comfortably on your back with your legs straight and your feet apart

repeat silently to yourself after me:…

If you like to HAVE this video, please consider donating $1 to show your support

more video: www.15minyoga.com


Share

Restorative Yoga: Sleeping Yoga

Restorative yoga is a new trend in the yoga industry. This type of yoga is good for someone with limited mobility. Instead of moving and mastering your body, you lie in a yoga position and relax into the pose.

There are many benefits, such as:

  • can be done in bed
  • relaxing
  • opens up tight muscles without over stressing them
  • gives a good stretch

But you won’t get the full benefit that you would from a regular yoga practice, such as:

  • strengthening your muscles
  • cardio vascular for the heart
Restorative Yoga at 7 Wonder of nature Halong bay, Vietnam
Restorative Yoga at 7 Wonder of nature Halong bay, Vietnam

I always think it is a good idea to try out anything new excercise-wise as long as you don’t feel in danger of getting injured. Yoga poses are designed to open up your body muscles and inner organs and to quiet the mind. Restorative yoga is usually reserved for the last part of yoga class. Many practitioners of yoga know this as the corp pose, where you lie in a comfortable position on your back with your legs straight and palms face upward. The student breathes into the posture and as they are guided into a relaxed meditative state, the instructor often hears people snoring .

The U.S. Department of Defense created an iRest program as a treatment for soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder, as mentioned in the article below:

“In one of his studies, published in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 20 participants suffering from chronic insomnia recorded their sleeping and waking habits in a diary for two weeks. Then, for eight weeks, they practised about 45 minutes of yoga before bed and continued recording these habits. Their total sleep time improved by about 12 per cent, and the time it took them to fall asleep dropped by about 30 per cent.”

Sleep yoga may be better than counting sheep by Dakshana Bascaramurty

Globe and Mail Update Published on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010 7:43PM EST Last updated on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2010 1:02PM EST

The irony wasn’t lost on Graydon Moffat: She was making her living helping others relax, but she was a stress case herself, unable to enjoy a good night’s sleep.

Ms. Moffat, a Toronto yoga instructor, was roused from her slumber almost every day between 2:30 and 4 a.m. She eventually threw a washcloth over her alarm clock – the bright green digits were a painful reminder of how little sleep she was getting.

“Sometimes I would be so desperate that I would go get something to drink – like alcohol,” she recalls. “I would try things like banana and warm milk. … If I would get really desperate I would take a sleeping pill.”

It was years before she realized a remedy was staring her in the face. Yoga. In bed.

Insomniacs are passing over the Ambien and sheep-counting for an Eastern-inspired approach to getting some shut-eye, and there’s a growing body of research backing up this form of treatment.

“People spend a lot of time getting dysfunctional thoughts like, ‘Oh my God, I’m not going to sleep tonight,’ and that triggers a stress response,” explains Sat Bir Khalsa, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston who has studied yoga as a treatment for insomnia since 2001.

Research suggests insomniacs have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their bodies, and a more active sympathetic drive (which arouses the body and sends blood flowing to the muscles). Regularly practising yoga can reduce that level of stress, he says.

“[Yoga] develops the ability to regulate attention. … Your stress system isn’t being triggered as much. With time and practice, the stress system begins to quiet down,” Dr. Khalsa says.

Hyperactive brain activity had kept Ms. Moffat, a single mother with a 10-year-old son, from staying asleep. She says it began after her son was born.

“You wake up in the middle of the night for your kids who need a bottle or a change, and your nervous system is so distressed. You’re so tired you can’t sleep,” she says.

Now, instead of pulling out her yoga mat in the middle of the night and slipping into some spandex, Ms. Moffat has found ways to do yoga in her pyjamas with the soft cushion of her mattress underneath her.

Yoga Restorative - Adam 2A favourite pose is lying back on her bed with legs upright against the wall. She also curls forward to do the child’s pose and sits upright for the pigeon pose, with an eye pillow putting pressure on her optic nerve.

“It’s not a magic button,” she says, though she finds that a few minutes will often send her back into slumber. “But I know that I’m not just lying down there and tossing and turning – I’m restoring my body.”

Most associate yoga with dynamic, invigorating poses that “wake up” the body. But you can swap your sun salutation for a more relaxing moon salutation at the end of the day to get a restful night of sleep, says Dee Dussault, a yoga instructor who teaches the Slo-Yo class at Toronto’s Follow Your Bliss studio.

“It’s like foreplay before bed to set the mood before sleep,” she says.

The last part of her class focuses on yoga nidra, a type of practice that puts more emphasis on breathing and relaxation than on body-stimulating poses.

Ms. Dussault goes through a “full scan of the body” in that 20-minute portion of the class, and there’s often an audio cue when it’s working. “Usually by the time we get through the whole body … I can hear people snoring as we do it.”

Dr. Khalsa isn’t surprised by these results. He’s focused his research on yoga nidra, which he sees as a much healthier, lasting treatment for sleeping disorders than medication.

“My major complaint with sleeping pills is that it doesn’t address the problem,” he says. “It’s just a hammer to knock your brain out.”

In one of his studies, published in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 20 participants suffering from chronic insomnia recorded their sleeping and waking habits in a diary for two weeks. Then, for eight weeks, they practised about 45 minutes of yoga before bed and continued recording these habits. Their total sleep time improved by about 12 per cent, and the time it took them to fall asleep dropped by about 30 per cent.

In 2006, the U.S. Department of Defense researched the iRest program (based on yoga nidra) as a treatment for soldiers returning from Afghanistan and Iraq with post-traumatic stress disorder – a major symptom of which is insomnia. The success of the program led to its adoption at Veterans Affairs facilities across the country.

Veronique Michel, a 48-year-old Montreal resident who works in insurance, says yoga nidra has greatly improved her sleep patterns.

During the busy times of the year, her job would follow her home at night and on weekends – and then straight to bed.

“I would experience some kind of insomnia for weeks because I worry and then I’m unable to get back to sleep,” she says.

She started taking weekly yoga nidra classes after work. Lying on her back with legs and arms outstretched, palms facing upward, she would slowly relax each part of her body. The effects lasted long after she left the class, she says.

In the last quarter of the 2009 – usually the most stressful of the year for her – she noticed she wasn’t waking up as often in the middle of the night. She credits yoga for this.

“You’re relaxing your entire body, but you’re also breathing. … You just co-ordinate all of that and your thoughts towards sleeping and relaxing and putting the day behind you.”

Veronique Michel, a 48-year-old Montreal resident who works in insurance, says yoga nidra has greatly improved her sleep patterns.

During the busy times of the year, her job would follow her home at night and on weekends – and then straight to bed.

“I would experience some kind of insomnia for weeks because I worry and then I’m unable to get back to sleep,” she says.

She started taking weekly yoga nidra classes after work. Lying on her back with legs and arms outstretched, palms facing upward, she would slowly relax each part of her body. The effects lasted long after she left the class, she says.

In the last quarter of the 2009 – usually the most stressful of the year for her – she noticed she wasn’t waking up as often in the middle of the night. She credits yoga for this.

“You’re relaxing your entire body, but you’re also breathing. … You just co-ordinate all of that and your thoughts towards sleeping and relaxing and putting the day behind you.”

Share

guided relaxation in Savasana yoga / corpse pose

I make this video on the beach of  Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. A guided relaxation, with the ocean waves crashing in the back ground.

It will help to quiet your body and mind. Help you to just relax. It will help you  sleep, if  having problem sleeping.

Sitting in a comfortable position or lie in Savasana yoga / corpse pose:

  • Lie on your back with legs apart, palms face upward
  • close your eyes and breath deeply
  • Listen the the ocean weave and silently repeated after the voice instructions.

  • Share